News

Growth areas win funding boost

22 May 2020

NGAA Member Councils have been allocated more than $26.5 million in federal government funding to deliver priority local road and community infrastructure projects. Growth area councils received more than the average amount of funding, aligning with NGAA’s COVID-19 Economic Recovery Proposal where we called on the Government to prioritise allocations for growth areas in the immediate response to the pandemic. We will continue to advocate for similar long-term recognition of growth area needs to address long standing infrastructure deficits. 

The Local Road and Community Infrastructure (LRCI) Program is one of two components of a $1.8 billion local government stimulus package. Early payment of $1.3 billion of next year’s Financial Assistance Grants is the second component.

The money will be available to councils from 1 July, 2020, and can be put towards local road projects, and community infrastructure projects such as bike paths, community halls and playgrounds.

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